by Bobbi L. Newman

A place to share and save things that interest me.

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Too few library leaders possess the willingness to trade command and control for participation, creativity, and innovation.
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booksdirect:

"Relax, buddy … they invented the vacuum cleaner, yet I’m still here … "

booksdirect:

"Relax, buddy … they invented the vacuum cleaner, yet I’m still here … "

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Reading a scientific paper is a completely different process than reading an article about science in a blog or newspaper. Not only do you read the sections in a different order than they’re presented, but you also have to take notes, read it multiple times, and probably go look up other papers for some of the details. Reading a single paper may take you a very long time at first. Be patient with yourself. The process will go much faster as you gain experience.
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Are You and Your Wireless Devices Prepared for Emergencies?

Bonus tip from me - invest in an external battery like this one New Trent - External Battery Charger for Smartphones and Tablets. Most will charge your phone completely at least twice. 

From the article:

Emergencies are unpredictable, but here are some simple tips to follow so you – and your wireless devices – are prepared.

Before:

  • Save emergency numbers (doctors, vets, family, friends, etc.) on ALL wireless devices. By doing so, you’ll know you have the contact information needed, even if your device is lost or runs out of power.
  • Keep your wireless devices and chargers close and safe from the elements. If a hurricane or flooding is possible, consider sealing the extra batteries or chargers in a waterproof bag.

During:

  • Safety first. You may be tempted to film or photograph an unusual situation, but don’t! Stay away from dangerous situations.
  • Limit non-emergency communications to texts, not voice calls. Disasters may challenge networks, so limit your non-emergency communications to texts, not voice calls. This will help first responders and911 callers so they may communicate with each other. If you need 911 services and it is safe for you to do so, remember that voice calls are preferred, not texts.
  • Save your battery. If you lose power, turn off superfluous applications (such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth) and minimize usage and your screen’s brightness. If you would need 911, you want to make sure your device has power.

Check out the rest of the “E.M.E.R.G.E.N.C.Y.” tips and suggestions on how to extend your battery life.

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"IN U.S. PUBLIC libraries nationwide, the materials budget rose 2% on average in 2013. While print book spending has fallen 7% in a decade, last year it steadied at 59% of the materials budget—the same figure reported in 2012. Book budgets actually rose 1.5% overall after a three-year lag, and circulation grew 2% on average. Finally, ebook integration into the library world is just about complete, with nine in ten libraries now loaning ebooks and a range of systems in place for measuring their circulation.
These conclusions are drawn from LJ’s 2014 materials survey, which collects budget and circulation data on the wide array of holdings available in public libraries today. The survey represents every size library in every region of the country, including both library systems and independent institutions. The numbers are then weighted to mirror the public library universe by population served. The survey, which for five years has charted the growing presence of ebooks in public libraries, now goes further, reporting on ebook budgets and circulation by category, with instructive results. But first, some basics of budget and circulation overall.”
(via Materials Shift | Materials Survey 2014)

"IN U.S. PUBLIC libraries nationwide, the materials budget rose 2% on average in 2013. While print book spending has fallen 7% in a decade, last year it steadied at 59% of the materials budget—the same figure reported in 2012. Book budgets actually rose 1.5% overall after a three-year lag, and circulation grew 2% on average. Finally, ebook integration into the library world is just about complete, with nine in ten libraries now loaning ebooks and a range of systems in place for measuring their circulation.

These conclusions are drawn from LJ’s 2014 materials survey, which collects budget and circulation data on the wide array of holdings available in public libraries today. The survey represents every size library in every region of the country, including both library systems and independent institutions. The numbers are then weighted to mirror the public library universe by population served. The survey, which for five years has charted the growing presence of ebooks in public libraries, now goes further, reporting on ebook budgets and circulation by category, with instructive results. But first, some basics of budget and circulation overall.”

(via Materials Shift | Materials Survey 2014)

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In any profession, particularly one that has existed long enough that no one can remember a time when it didn’t exist, members have a tendency to equate provisional solutions to particular problems with deep truths about the world.
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diversityinya:

Diversity in 2013 New York Times Young Adult Bestsellers

Over the past year or so, I’ve examined diversity in the Publishers Weekly bestsellers (here’s 2012 and here’s 2013) as well as the Best Fiction for Young Adults (here’s 2013, here’s 2014). One list I haven’t looked at until now is the New York Times bestseller lists for young adult books.

My conclusions? There’s nothing really surprising about the diversity on the New York Times bestseller lists for young adult books. They tell the same story that Publishers Weekly does, but with a slightly different sample: There isn’t much diversity.

[Continue Reading]

Tagged: #diversity
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