Bobbi L. Newman
Speaker. Writer. Headed to CU Boulder for Communication PhD. MA PoliSci, MA LibSci. Dog owner, runner, gamer, knitter, lover of whiskey, & beer.

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lecieltumultueux:

New Kindle Helps Readers Show Off By Shouting Title Of Book Loudly And Repeatedly

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ilovecharts:

Topics you can’t talk too much about, and some you can.
This week in coolness: It’s Not Cool To Dance To A Song About Stalking.
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pewinternet:

Nearly two-thirds (63%) of U.S. newspapers had at least one woman in their top three editing positions in 2013, according to the new annual census from the American Society of News Editors (ASNE).
The overall count of full-time daily newspaper staffers dropped to about 36,700 from about 38,000 last year — down about 3%.
More in a new Fact Tank post.

pewinternet:

Nearly two-thirds (63%) of U.S. newspapers had at least one woman in their top three editing positions in 2013, according to the new annual census from the American Society of News Editors (ASNE).

The overall count of full-time daily newspaper staffers dropped to about 36,700 from about 38,000 last year — down about 3%.

More in a new Fact Tank post.

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Kindle Unlimited is No Threat to Libraries, The Scary Issue Facing Libraries, and Everyone, is Net Neutrality

I completely agree with David Lankes’ post on Kindle Unlimited

Can I tell you why I’m so excited about Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited service? Because, aside from all my publications with academic presses and journals, I am an independent publisher. My book, Expect More, was published as a physical copy and digital copy through Amazon’s tools. What’s better, I’m automatically part of Kindle Unlimited, and maybe this will get me more readers. You see, the vast majority of the 600,000 titles in Kindle Unlimited are self-published books.Want the top sellers in the New York Times list? Ah, go to a library.

Surprised that a professor of library and information science isn’t all that worried about the fate of libraries (mostly public libraries) in the light of Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited launching it’s “Netflix for Books?” Don’t be. Amazon joins a pretty crowded field, including Overdrive,Scribd, and Oyster. What’s more, Amazon is leading with 600,000 items, where libraries have access to tens of millions of titles…seriously.

But honestly, that is nowhere near as scary as things like network neutrality, where Internet Service Providers are trying to figure out how to monetize your viewing habits and pick the winners and losers in new Internet services. And that, frankly, pales in comparison to digital sharecropping, where huge corporations get massive billion-dollar valuations based on the content and work of their “users.” I mean, who is using whom when YouTube gets bought by Google for over a billion dollars and not one video producer saw a dime?

So are there scary things going on? Yup? Thank God we have some folks who are in the information industry and base their work on century-old values.Thank goodness there are information professionals that continue to maintain an internationally-distributed network of local knowledge hubs dedicated to community engagement and free and fair access to the life blood of democracy: information. Thank goodness there are librarians who long ago realized that it is not the size of your collection, but the reach of your community that really matters.

By the way, if you have $10 a month lying around, try Marvel Unlimited. If you are a comic book fan it is fricken incredible.

Read More

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Please Participate! Test the Internet Speed at Your Library

2014 National Survey of Digital Inclusion at Public Libraries

Internet Speed Test

Take the Speed Test!

Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park are conducting a broadband speed test to gauge the quality of public access to the internet in our nation’s public libraries. The project also is supported by the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies (COSLA), the Public Library Association (PLA), the Urban Libraries Council (ULC), and the Association of Rural and Small Libraries (ARSL).

Your participation is important! As part of its E-rate Program modernization effort, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is gathering a range of data to inform changes in the program and better understand library and school broadband needs. Access to high quality broadband has emerged as a central issue in the ability of libraries to build digitally inclusive communities, and ensure digital equity, readiness, and literacy. Through this effort, ALA, IMLS, and the broader library community seek your help in informing the FCC about the quality of broadband access in public libraries.

If you are running the test on a mobile device (e.g., iPad, iPhone, Android tablet/phone), click HERE.

Speed Test Instructions

By August 8, 2014, we are asking that you run the speed test at least twice each from a public access computer and a WiFi connected device – once when the library is closed, and again while the library is open to the public (but you can run it as many times as you like if you’d like to test the quality of your connection at peak vs. slower times of day, for instance – all results will be captured and used):

  1. Go to a public access computer or connect a device to the library’s public access wireless (WiFi) connection.
  2. Log in to the survey dashboard below using your library ID number (you can look it up by using the Look it up! feature.

    NOTE: If you’ve run the speed test at least once before, you will see the results on the dashboard once logged in. The results from all tests are captured, but the last run test results are shown.

  3. Select the branch (if applicable) at which you are running the speed test by clicking on the BEGIN button.
    • Indicate:
      • The library’s subscribed download and upload broadband speeds (e.g., 1.5Mbps, 10Mbps)
      • If the library broadband is automatically increased at peak use times
      • If the library is open or closed at the time of the test
      • Your assessment of network traffic (e.g., “typical”, “peak”)
      • Whether the test is being run on a desktop or from a WiFi-connected device

    NOTE: It’s possible to skip these questions, but having answers to them is very important to interpreting the speed test results.

  4. Run the speed test. Click on the CONTINUE TO SPEED TEST button to begin the test. The test will automatically begin detecting your bandwidth.

    NOTE: If you’ve run the speed test at least once before, you will see the results on the dashboard once logged in. The results from all tests are captured, but the results from the last speed test results are shown.

Thank you for your participation! Need help? Contact iPAC at the University of Maryland e-mail; 301-405-9445 phone.

Read More http://digitalinclusion.pnmi.com/speedtest/

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chicagopubliclibrary:

#ButFirstLetMeTakeASelfie 

chicagopubliclibrary:

#ButFirstLetMeTakeASelfie 

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medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:




The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.
from the infographic:
Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:• only 8% of films star a protagonist of color• of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)• 0% of protagonists are women of color• 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ• 1% of protagonists are people with a disability

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.

from the infographic:

Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:

• only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
• of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
• 0% of protagonists are women of color
• 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
• 1% of protagonists are people with a disability

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How to spot (and avoid) a horrible boss

1. Keep an ear to the ground

2. Honest eyes

3. If it is “I” before “we”, reconsider becoming an employee

4. The Dominator

5. Throw in the culture question

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If I learned ONE thing by blogging, tweeting, or being online in general, it is this.
(via Life Quote: People will love you. People will hate you. And none..)

If I learned ONE thing by blogging, tweeting, or being online in general, it is this.

(via Life Quote: People will love you. People will hate you. And none..)

Tagged: #quotes #life
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Litographs Litographs Litographs Litographs

nprbooks:

The Litographs Tattoos Kickstarter campaign has taken a novel (GET IT?) approach to encouraging contributions: The first 2,500 backers will also reserve their place in the world’s longest (temporary) tattoo chain.

Litographs has broken up Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland into 2,500 temporary tats. Once they hit their goal, they’ll send the ink out for backers to apply, photograph and upload to their website. “Our goal,” they say, “is to recreate this iconic novel by showcasing every single word on the skin of 2,500 Kickstarter backers.” Which, OK, sounds a little gross — but I’m intrigued!

-Nicole

Even though it is highly unlikely I’ll receive the section that includes “we’re all mad here” I’m still donating because book quote tattoos! 

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